Jeffrey Treistman, Ph.D.

Jeffrey Treistman headshot
Assistant Professor

National Security Department
Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences

Education

Ph.D., International Relations & Public Policy, Syracuse University, 2017

M.A., Economics, Syracuse University, 2012

M.P.P., International & Global Affairs, Harvard University, 2010

B.A., History, University of Colorado, 2003

About Jeffrey

Dr. Treistman is an Assistant Professor of National Security at the University of New Haven’s Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences. Prior to coming to the University of New Haven, Dr. Treistman was a Research Assistant at the Institute of National Security and Counterterrorism. He also served as a consultant to the Department of Defense’s Africa Command (AFRICOM) and was a Policy Advisor for the Department of State in Iraq. His research interests focus on military policy, international relations, asymmetric war, and terrorism.

Publications
Peer Reviewed

“Using Combat Losses of Medical Personnel to Estimate the Value of Battlefield Trauma Care in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan.” Defence and Peace Economics 26, no. 5 (2015): 465-490. (Co-authors: Ying Deng, Chris Rohlfs, and Ryan Sullivan.)

“The Colonial War Revisited: Coding the Military Outcomes.” African Security Review 21, no. 3 (2012): 68-74.

“Home Away From Home: Dynamics of Counterinsurgency Warfare.” Comparative Strategy 31, no. 3 (2012): 235-252.

“Victory Over Terrorism: Essential Services as Counterinsurgency Strategy.” Joint Force Quarterly 53 (2009): 110-115.

Op-Ed

“ISIS turns to lone wolves for Christmas attacks as caliphate crumbles.” The Hill, November 29, 2017.

“Las Vegas Highlights Islamist Terrorism is not America’s Greatest Domestic Threat.” The Hill, October 4, 2017.

“We Should Question US Rail Safety in Wake of Failed London Train Bombing.” The Hill, September 25, 2017.

Courses Taught
  • NSEC 1100: Intro to National Security Studies
  • NSEC 4578/6678: Homeland Security & Terrorism
  • NSEC 2251: Quantitative Applications in National Security
  • CJST 6613: Quantitative Applications in Criminal Justice
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