Dr. Gabriella M. Petrick

"Red or White Wine: How Cabernet and Chardonnay Came to Define Wine"
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the Marvin K. Peterson Library, Upper Level

 
Synopsis
 

Throughout the twentieth century, France has dominated quality wine production. Italy, although a prolific producer, largely made “rough” wines of inferior quality. New world producers like California, Australia, and South Africa largely made sweet wines for the mass market. In her talk, Dr. Gabriella M. Petrick, will examine how the global palate for wine shifted from syrupy sweet to bold and dry by the turn of the twenty-first century.

 
Biographical Information
 

Gabriella M. Petrick, Ph.D. received her degree from the University of Delaware as a Hagley Fellow and is currently an Associate Professor in the Departments of Hospitality and Tourism Management at the University of New Haven. Her interdisciplinary research on food combines the fields of the history of technology, sensory history, environmental history and the history of science.

Additionally Dr. Petrick’s training at the Culinary Institute of America, Cornell University and at several wineries in Napa and Sonoma Counties has shaped her theoretical approach to the history of taste. Her book, entitled Industrializing Taste: Food Processing and the Transformation of the American Diet, 1900-1965, analyzes how new food processing techniques transformed the foods available to American consumers as well as how housewives incorporated these new industrial foods into their family’s diet over the course of the last century.

She is also finishing a second book project, Sweet, Sour, Salty, Bitter: Taste in History, for the sensory history series at the University of Illinois Press that looks at the importance of taste historically. Her new project looks at the globalization of wine in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, here at the Linda Hall Library. She has won many awards for her scholarship including the Hindle Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Society for the History of Technology, the W. Gabriel Carras Award for Junior Scholars from the Steinhardt School, New York University.

She has also won both National Science Foundation and USDA grants. She has published in the Journal of America History, Agricultural History, History and Technology, among other journals and edited volumes. She has appeared on the History Channel, the Food Network, NPR, and comments in publications such as The Atlantic and the Washington Post.

 

Dr. Gabriella Petrick's web page

 

Dr Gabrielle Petrick