Bradley Woodworth, Ph.D.

Bradley Woodworth Headshot
Associate Professor

Division of Humanities - History
College of Arts and Sciences
Education

Ph.D., Russian History, Indiana University
M.A., Russian and Soviet Area Studies, Harvard University
B.A., Russian Language and Literature, Brigham Young University

Statement

I fell in love with the peoples and cultures of northeastern Europe after I had the good fortune as a student to live and study for extended periods of time in Russia, Finland, and Estonia. It was my interest in languages perhaps that drew me towards learning how the differing linguistic and ethnic groups which in the past have shared these areas as their homeland both cooperated and struggled over the nature of their multiethnic societies.

In my teaching I try to show that the study of history is centered on a dynamic dialogue with the documents and artifacts the past has left us and with other historically-minded people as we search for the most fruitful approaches to understand past societies and eras. This search I believe prepares us better to face current social issues and problems.

Peer Reviewed Books
  • Russland an der Ostsee: Imperiale Strategien der Macht und kulturelle Wahrnehmungsmuster (16. bis 20. Jahrhundert) / Russia on the Baltic: Imperial Strategies of Power and Cultural Patterns of Perception (16th-20th Centuries), co-edited with Karsten Brüggemann (Cologne: Böhlau, 2012).
  • Vene impeerium ja Baltikum: venestus, rahvuslus ja moderniseerimine 19. sajandi teisel poolel ja 20. sajandi alguses [The Russian Empire and the Baltic: Russification, nationality and modernization in the second half of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century], co-edited with Tõnu Tannberg. Volumes I and II. Acta et Commentationes Archivi Historici Estoniae 16 (23) and 18 (25) (Tartu: Eesti Ajalooarhiiv, 2009 and 2010).
Non-peer reviewed book

Co-written with Constance E. Richards, St. Petersburg (Bloom’s Literary Places) (Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2005).

Book Chapters

(peer-reviewed chapters indicated with an asterisk)

  • *“Der Wandel im Städtewesen im 19. Jahrhundert,” forthcoming in Das Baltikum: Geschichte einer europäischen Region. Band 2: Vom Beginn der Frühen Neuzeit bis zur Gründung der modernen Staaten (Stuttgart: Hiersemann Verlag, 2021).
  • *“The Imperial Career of Gustaf Mannerheim: Mobility and Identity of a Non-Russian within the Russian Empire,” in Eliten im Vielvölkerreich: Imperiale Biographien in Russland und Österreich-Ungarn (1850-1918) [Elites in the multiethnic empire: Imperial careers in Russia and the Habsburg Empire, 1850-1918], Tim Buchen and Malte Rolf, editors (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2015), pp. 135-154
  • *(co-written with Karsten Brüggemann) “Entangled Pasts – Russia and the Baltic Region,” in Karsten Brüggemann and Bradley D. Woodworth, eds., Russland an der Ostsee: Imperiale Strategien der Macht und kulturelle Wahrnehmungsmuster (16. bis 20. Jahrhundert) / Russia on the Baltic: Imperial Strategies of Power and Cultural Patterns of Perception (16th-20th Centuries) (Cologne: Böhlau, 2012), pp. 3-26.
  • *“Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim,” in Stephen M. Norris and Willard Sunderland, eds., Russia’s People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2012), pp. 221-231.
  • *“Music Associations and National Identity in Russia’s Baltic Provinces: The Case of Tallinn, 1850-1914,” in Jörg Hackmann, ed., Vereinskultur und Zivilgesellschaft in Nordosteuropa. Regionale Spezifik und europäische Zusammenhänge / Associational Culture and Civil Society in North Eastern Europe. Regional Features and the European Context (Cologne: Böhlau, 2012), pp. 307-327.
  • *“Multiethnicity and Estonian Tsarist State Officials in Estland Province, 1881-1914,” in Donald K. Rowney and Eugene Huskey, eds., Russian Bureaucracy and the State: Officialdom from Alexander III to Putin (Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009), pp. 72-88.
  • *(lead author, co-written with Tõnu Tannberg), “‘Imperiaalne pööre’ paljurahvuselise Vene impeeriumi ajaloo uurimisel” [The “imperial turn” in the study of the history of the multiethnic Russian Empire] in Tõnu Tannberg and Bradley Woodworth, eds., Vene impeerium ja Baltikum: venestus, rahvuslus ja moderniseerimine 19. sajandi teisel poolel ja 20. sajandi alguses (Tartu: Eesti Ajalooarhiiv, 2009), pp. 5-15.
  • “An Ambiguous Monument: Peter the Great’s Return to Tallinn in 1910,” in Rut Biuttner [Ruth Büttner] et al., eds., Problemy natsional’noi identifikatsii, kul’turnye i politicheskie sviazi Rossii so stranami Baltiiskogo regiona v XVIII-XX vekakh (Samara: Izdatel’stvo Parus, 2001), pp. 205-219.
Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals
  • *Estonian Modern History in the Twenty-First Century,” coauthored with Karsten Brüggemann, in Acta Historica Tallinnensia 26 (2020), 79-102.
  • “Rozhdenie mnogonatsional’noi biurokratii. Pribaltika v epokhu Aleksandra III” [The Genesis of a Multiethnic Bureaucracy. The Baltic Region in the Era of Alexander III], in Rodina 2/2015: 81-83.
  • “Rozhdenie mnogonatsional’noi biurokratii. Pribaltika v epokhu Aleksandra III” [The Genesis of a Multiethnic Bureaucracy. The Baltic Region in the Era of Alexander III], in Rodina 2/2015: 81-83.
  • “Mitmetähenduslik mälestusmärk: Peeter Suure naasmine Tallinna 1910. aastal,” in Tuna: Ajalookultuuri ajakiri (Tallinn) 3/2010: 82-91. This Estonian-language article is a translation of a reworked version of my article “An Ambiguous Monument: Peter the Great’s Return to Tallinn in 1910,” in Biuttner, et al., listed above.
  • “Paljurahvuselisus ja eestlastest riigiametnikud Eestimaa kubermangus aastatel 1870-1914” [Multiethnicity and Estonian state officials in Estland province, 1870-1914],” in Tõnu Tannberg, ed., Vene aeg Eestis. Uurimusi 16. sajandi keskpaigast kuni 20. sajandi alguseni [The Russian era in Estonia. Studies on the mid-16th century to the early 20th century]. Acta et Commentationes Archivi Historici Estoniae 14 (21). (Tartu: Eesti Ajalooarhiiv, 2006), pp. 345-360.
  • “Patterns of Civil Society in the Modernizing Multiethnic City: A German Town in the Russian Empire Becomes Estonian,” Ab Imperio: Theory and History of Nationalities and Nationalism in the Post-Soviet Space 2 (2006): 135-161.
  • “Administrative Reform and Social Policy in the Baltic Cities of the Russian Empire: Riga and Reval, 1870-1914,” Jahrbuch für europäische Verwaltungsgeschichte 16 (2004), pp. 111-150.
Other Articles
  • “KGB Surveillance in the Soviet Baltic Republics,” Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies Newsletter, Summer 2020: 22-24.
  • “Scholars of the Baltic Region, Scandinavia gather at Yale University,” Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies Newsletter, Summer 2014: 4, 7.
  • “Reflections on Post-Baltic Identities. A Symposium “Do the Baltic States Exist? Re-evaluations of Europe and the Post-Cold War World” (coauthored with Mara Lazda), Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies Newsletter, Spring 2013: 1, 4-5, 8.
  • "Incorporating the Baltic Region in Upper-Division History Survey Courses,” Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies Newsletter. January 2012, p. 16.
  • “Kuidas kirjutada Tallinna ajalugu? Muusikaelu ja kodanikuühiskonna areng tsaariaegses palju-rahvuselises linnas” [How to write the history of Tallinn? Musical life and the development of civil society in a tsarist-era multiethnic city], Vikerkaar [Tallinn], Nr. 7/8, 2009: 99-116.
  • “Finland and the Baltic Provinces,” in John Merriman and Jay Winter, eds., Europe—1789 to 1914—Encyclopedia of Industry and Empire. Vol. 2 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006), pp. 817-824.
  • “Estonia,” and “Latvia,” in John Merriman and Jay Winter, eds., Europe Since 1914—Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Vols. 2 and 3 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006), pp. 980-984 and 1617-1622.
  • “Recent Books on Baltic History in English,” in Rossiia i Baltiia: Chelovek v istorii (Moscow: Nauka, 2006), pp. 246-258.
  • “Was the Nobility a Dominant Force in Russian Society at the End of the Nineteenth Century?”, “Were Social-Class Divisions in Late Imperial Russia Insurmountable?” and “Were Sergei Witte’s Policies Favoring Industrialization and Development Successful?” in Paul du Quenoy, ed., History in Dispute, Volume 21: Revolutionary Russia, 1890-1930 (Farmington Hills, MI: St. James Press, 2005), pp. 6-7, 177-180, and 209-211.
  • “Janis Cakste,” The Supplement to the Modern Encyclopedia of Russian, Soviet, and Eurasian History, vol. 5 (Gulf Breeze, Fla.: Academic International Press, 2004), pp. 83-84.
  • “A. N. Bellegarde,” The Supplement to the Modern Encyclopedia of Russian, Soviet, and Eurasian History, vol. 4 (Gulf Breeze, Fla.: Academic International Press, 2003), pp. 106-107.
  • “Homeland and History: The Teaching of History in Estonia’s Russian-Language Schools,” ISRE Newsletter of East European, Eurasian and Russian Education 7:2 (spring, 1999): 2, 34-38.
  • “Arbujad,” “Karl Ast,” “Johannes Aavik,” “Artur Alliksaar,” in The Supplement to the Modern Encyclopedia of Russian, Soviet, and Eurasian History vols. 1 and 2 (1995, 1997).
Book Reviews
  • Tõnu Tannberg, ed., Behind the Iron Curtain: Soviet Estonia in the Era of the Cold War (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2015), in Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 67:3 (2018): 459-461.
  • Alexey Golubev and Irina Takala, The Search for a Socialist El Dorado: Finnish Immigration to Soviet Karelia from the United States and Canada in the 1930s (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2014), in Slavic Review 75:1 (2016): 166-168.
  • Tarmo Vakhter [Vahter], Estoniia: Zharkoe leto 91-go. Avgustovskii putch i vozrozhdenie nezavisimosti [Estonia: The hot summer of ’91. The August putsch and the rebirth of independence]. (Tallinn: Hea Lugu, 2012), in Russian Review 74:3 (2015): 537-538.
  • Steven Seegel, Mapping Europe’s Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012), in Canadian-American Slavic Studies 49 (2015): 491-493.
  • Michael North, Geschichte der Ostsee (Munich: C. H. Beck, 2011), in Journal of Baltic Studies 44:3 (2013): 416-419.
  • Lea Leppik, Kalefaktoripojast professoriks. Tartu ülikooli teenistujate sotsiaalne mobiilsus 1802-1918 [Janitor’s son into professor. The social mobility of employees of the University of Tartu [Dorpat], 1802-1918] (Tartu: Kleio / Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo museum, 2011), in Forschungen zur baltischen Geschichte 8 (2013): 299-304.
  • Max Engman, Pitkät jäähyväiset: Suomi Ruotsin ja Venäjän välissä vuoden 1809 jälkeen (Helsinki: WSOY, 2009), in Journal of Baltic Studies 42:4 (2011): 557-560.
  • Darius Staliūnas, Making Russians: Meaning and Practice of Russification in Lithuania and Belarus after 1863 (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2007), in Forschungen zur baltischen Geschichte 6 (2011): 310-313.
  • Carsten Goehrke and Jürgen von Ungern-Sternberg, Die baltischen Staaten im Schnittpunkt der Entwicklungen: Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (Basel: Schwabe & Co., 2002), in Nordost-Archiv XIX (Neue Folge) (2011): 252-258.
  • B. Pietrov-Ennker, and G. N. Ul’ianova, eds., Grazhdanskaia identichnost’ i sfera grazhdanskoi deiatel’nosti v Rossiiskoi imperii: Vtoraia polovina XIX – nachalo XX veka (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 2007), in Russian Review 70:1 (2011): 153-155
  • I. I. Shangina, et al., eds., Mnogonatsional’nyi Peterburg. Istoriia, Religii, Narody (St. Petersburg: Iskusstvo-SPB, 2002); Max Engman, Pietarinsuomalaiset (Helsinki: Werner Söderström Osakeyhtiö, 2004); Raimo Pullat, Lootuste linn. Peterburi ja eesti haritlaskonna kujunemine kuni 1917 (Tallinn: Estopol, 2004). Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 9:4 (2008): 963-976.
  • Ekaterina Pravilova, Finantsy imperii. Den’gi i vlast’ v politike Rossii na natsional’nykh okrainakh, 1801-1917 (Moscow: Novoe izdatel’stvo, 2006), in Russian Review 66:4 (2007): 713.
  • Kate Brown, A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004), in Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 55:1 (2006): 155-156.
  • Alvydas Nikžentaitis, Stefan Schreiner and Darius Staliūnas, eds. The Vanished World of Lithuanian Jews (Editions Rodopi, B. V.: Amsterdam and New York, 2004) and Jean-Jacques Subrenat, ed. Estonia: Identity and Independence (Editions Rodopi, B. V.: Amsterdam and New York, 2004), in Nordost-Archiv XIV (Neue Folge) (2005): 426-430.
  • E. P. Fedosova, Rossiia i Pribaltika: kul’turnyi dialog. Vtoraia polovina XIX-nachalo XX veka (Moscow: Institut Rossiiskoi Istorii RAN, 1999), in Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 5:4 (Fall 2004): 791-96.
  • Michael Walzer, Sallivusest (On Toleration, Yale UP, 1997 in Estonian translation). Vikerkaar (Tallinn), vol. 9, 1998: 109-112.
Translations

(from Estonian)

  • Ea Jansen, Eestlane muutuvas ajas: seisusühiskonnast kodanikeühiskonda [Estonians in changing times: from estate society to civil society] (Tartu, Estonia: Eesti Ajalooarhiiv, 2007), “Summary,” pp. 463-506

(from Russian)

  • Boris Mironov, A Social History of Imperial Russia, 1700-1917, “Preface and Acknowlegements,” Vol. I, pp. xvii-xxxiii; “The Law: Courts, Crimes, and Punishments,” Vol. II, pp. 223-365 (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 2000).
Conference Papers and Presentations
  • “The Mayors of Tallinn, 1877-1917: Estate and Nationality in Local and Imperial Politics,” presented at the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) yearly conference, San Francisco, November 24, 2019.
  • “Civic and Cross-National Influences in Estonia’s Song Festivals,” presented at the Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe, Gdansk, Poland, June 27, 2019.
  • “The Development of Civil Society in the Tsarist-Era Multiethnic Baltic Region: The Case of Tallinn,” presented at the Second Riga Readings in Social Sciences, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia, November 22, 2018.
  • “Tallinn City Government during World War I,” presented at the Ninth International Conference on Baltic and Nordic Studies in Romania, Valahia University of Targoviste, Targoviste, Romania, November 15, 2018.
  • Presentation on roundtable, “Looking Back at the Singing Revolution of 1988-1991,” Yale conference on Baltic and Scandinavian Study, Yale University, March 14, 2014.
  • Presentation on roundtable “The Baltic Revolution (1988-1991) Revisited,” the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) yearly conference, Boston, November 24, 2013.
  • “Estonia’s Push for Independence: A Historian Reflects on His Work as a Journalist, 1990-1991,” presented at the Baltic Studies in Europe conference, Tallinn, Estonia, June 19, 2013.
  • “Narrating the Baltic Past – New Subjects, New Histories,” presented at symposium held at Yale University, “Do the Baltic States Exist? Re-evaluations of Europe and the Post-Cold War World,” April 17, 2013.
  • “Tallinn‘s Russian Community, 1860-1914: Social Diversity and the Imperatives of Nationalism,” presented at the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES, formerly AAASS) yearly conference, New Orleans, November 16, 2012.
  • “Civil Society and Nationality in the Baltic Provinces of the Russian Empire, 1850-1914: The Case of Tallinn,” presented at the bi-annual conference of the Finno-Ugric Studies Association of Canada (FUSAC), University of Waterloo, May 26, 2012.
  • “Tsarist Officers from the Baltic Provinces and Finland, 1850-1917,” presented at the workshop Imperial Biographien: Elitekarrieren im Habsburger, Russischen und Osmanischen Vielvölkerrich (1850-1918), Technische Universität Berlin, May 5, 2012.
  • “Gustaf Mannerheim’s Several Lives; Tsarist Russian, Finnish, and Eurasian,” Ninth Conference of Baltic Studies in Europe, Stockholm, Sweden, June 13, 2011.
  • “Gustaf Mannerheim and Eurasian History,” Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN) yearly conference, New York City, April 16, 2011.
  • “The Literary Possibilities of a Multicultural Identity: the Works of Estonian Writers Andrei Hvostov and Igor Kotjuh,” VIII World Congress of the International Council for Central and East European Studies, Stockholm, Sweden, July 29, 2010.
  • “The Literary Possibilities of a Multicultural Historical Memory: the work of Estonian writer Andrei Hvostov,” Eighth Conference of Baltic Studies in Europe, Kaunas, Lithuania, June 13, 2009.
  • “Recent Trends in the Historiography of the Multinational Russian Empire,” Tallinn University’s Institute of History, January 22, 2009.
  • “Education in a Multiethnic City of the Russian Empire: Tallinn’s Schools, 1870-1914,” American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies yearly conference, New Orleans, November 18, 2007.
  • “Petersburg’s Non-Russians: Baltic peoples in the Multiethnic Imperial Capital,” Seventh Conference of Baltic Studies in Europe, Lüneburg, Germany, June 9, 2007.
  • “Multiethnicity and Tsarist State Officials in the Baltic Provinces, 1880-1914,” Workshop on Russian Tsarist Officialdom, National Institute for Sociological Research (INES), Paris, France, March 9, 2007.
  • “Those Who Wore the Cap of the Bureaucrat: Multiethnicity and Estonian Tsarist State Officials in Estland Province, 1870-1914,” VII World Congress of the International Council for Central and East European Studies, Berlin, Germany, July 28, 2005.
Languages

Primary languages (reading, speaking and writing):
Russian
Estonian
Finnish
German
Czech

Secondary languages:
Ukrainian
Hungarian
Georgian

Professional Organizations and Activities

Editorial Board, Acta et Commentationes Archivi Historici Estoniae / Eesti Ajalooarhiivi toimetised [Proceedings of the Estonian Historical Archives], (Tartu, Estonia), 2007 – present

Editorial Board, Tuna: Ajalookultuuri ajakiri [The past: a historical-cultural journal] (Tallinn, Estonia), 2007 – present

International Advisory Board, Latvijas Universitātes Žurnāls. Vēsture [Journal of the University of Latvia. History], 2019 – present

International Advisory Board, Lithuanian Historical Studies, 2018 – present

International Advisory Board, Acta Historica Tallinnensia, January 2020 – present

Vice-President for Conferences, Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies (AABS), 2012-2014. From 2008-2012 I was Vice-President for Publications for the AABS.

Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). Member.

In the Media