2018 News Items

News By Year

Advocates: State didn’t do enough to plan for CJTS closure

State officials had more than two years to plan for the closure of the state’s high-security detention facility for boys in Middletown, ideally by finding or creating alternative programs for the troubled juveniles it once housed.

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Dannel P. Malloy has submitted two proposed legislative bills that would raise the age of people protected by juvenile and "youthful offender" status from 18 to 21, he announced Tuesday at the University of New Haven.

The proposals are part of a broader effort to steer young people out of the prison system and smooth the way for them to better recover from youthful mistakes that might otherwise have a lasting, negative effect on their lives, Malloy said at a news conference in the entry hall of the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science.

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Tow Youth Justice Institute presents at 2018 Janet Reno Forum

Cover At the 2018 Janet Reno Forum: Transforming Juvenile Justice Systems on May 21st, William H. Carbone, Executive Director, Tow Youth Justice Institute, presented on Shrinking the Footprint of the Juvenile Justice System and the successes Connecticut has experienced over the past decade. He shared that from 2007 to 2017, there were 50% less cases referred to juvenile courts despite raising the age to 17 in 2010 and to 18 in 2012. Status offender reform began 10 years ago when the law was changed that status offenders could no longer be "punished" by using detention. Although concerns were raised by judges and prosecutors that this would increase the likelihood of safety issues for both the youth and the community, none of these things happened. In 2015, nearly 3,300 status offenders were referred to juvenile court, and 75% of them were for truancy and defiance of school rules. With the growing body of research on brain development and exposure to trauma, legislators were convinced that the schools and community could be doing more for these youth. This led to legislation that became effective August 15, 2017, removing truancy from offenses being referred to the Juvenile Courts. These reforms and others have led to the reduction of juvenile crime and the closing of Connecticut's only juvenile "jail", the Connecticut Juvenile Training School. By July 1, 2019, there will be no status offenders in the juvenile justice system in Connecticut. All of the changes Connecticut has implemented are evidence-based practices, and the outcomes of these legislative changes will be evaluated in the coming years. The Transforming Juvenile Justice Systems to Improve Public Safety and Youth Outcomes report was announced at the event and can be read by clicking the button below. Other states presenting that day include Kentucky, Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts and Florida. Thank you to The Center for Juvenile Justice at Georgetown University and the Council of State Governments for the opportunity to participate in the 2018 Janet Reno Forum!

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We are pleased to share the news!
2018 JJPOC Recommendations have passed as Public Act 18-31.

"AN ACT CONCERNING THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY AND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE AND CONCERNING TRANSFER OF JUVENILE SERVICES FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES TO THE COURT SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION OF THE JUDICIAL BRANCH".

We are so grateful to our Connecticut Legislators for their hard work and commitment. The following are the components of the PA 18-31:

  • DIVERTING CHILDREN FROM CONTACT WITH THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM
  • REMOVING BARRIERS IN EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN IN OUT OF HOME PLACEMENT
  • OPENING ACCESS TO THE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOLS FOR CHILDREN RETURNING FROM OUT OF HOME PLACEMENT
  • CREATING A DATA SYSTEM FOR "REAL TIME" SHARING OF EDUCATION RECORDS
  • PLANNING FOR A CONSOLIDATED EDUCATION SYSTEM FOR YOUTH IN CUSTODY
  • PLANNING FOR JUSTICE REINVESTMENT

Details of these components can be found in Sections 1 - 7 in PA 18-31.

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Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has submitted two proposed legislative bills that would raise the age of people protected by juvenile and "youthful offender" status from 18 to 21, he announced Tuesday at the University of New Haven.

The proposals are part of a broader effort to steer young people out of the prison system and smooth the way for them to better recover from youthful mistakes that might otherwise have a lasting, negative effect on their lives, Malloy said at a news conference in the entry hall of the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science.

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WNHH Community Radio: Criminal Justice Insider - Danielle Cooper

Danielle Cooper Check out our own Dr. Danielle Cooper as she talked about juvenile justice reform in Connecticut and the research behind it!

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