In the Media: July, 2017

Media Contact: Karen Grava, Director of Media Relations | KGrava@newhaven.edu | 203-972-7246

July 31, 2017 - WTIC-AM
Matthew Schmidt, assistant professor of national security and political science, comments on the Russia Sanctions Bill that was passed overwhelmingly by the House and Senate and is being signed by President Trump.
July 31, 2017 - i24News (Israel)
Howard Stoffer, associate professor of national security, comments on diplomatic options to North Korea’s ICBM launches and says the U.S. cannot only rely on China.
July 28, 2017 - New Haven Register
36 high school students from across the country attended the University of New Haven’s week-long Crime Scene Investigation Academy, where they received hands on experience and a real-life look into the handling of Crime Scene Investigations. This story was also featured in multiple media outlets including NBC Connecticut, Stamford Advocate, and the Greenwich Time.
July 25, 2017 - WTNH-TV8
The University of New Haven has named Diane Smith as a distinguished lecturer in the Communication, Film, and Media Studies Department where she will be teaching and redesigning the communications program for first-year students to prepare them not only for college but the working world as well.
July 25, 2017 - WTNH-TV8
Eva Sapi, professor of biology, notes that liquid Stevia is more effective in the test tube in killing the Lyme disease bacteria than traditional antibiotics. The treatment is now being tested in New York on humans.
July 25, 2017 - WTNH-TV8
The University’s Cyber Forensics Research Lab has spent time analyzing technology such as Fitbits to demonstrate how the devices can be used to solve crimes.
July 24, 2017 - San Francisco Chronicle
John DeCarlo, associate professor of criminal justice, comments on the pros and cons of using drones in police work. This story originated with a front page story in the New Haven Register and was picked up by the Associated Press. 
July 21, 2017 - E-International Relations
Vesna Markovic, associate professor and assistant dean of criminal justice, and Kenneth Gray, lecturer in criminal justice, comment on the current status of the Islamic State.
July 21, 2017 - Wallet Hub
James N. Mohs, assistant professor of accounting, comments on what credit scores mean for the average person.
July 20, 2017 - Outbreak News Today
Eva Sapi, associate professor of biology, discusses her study of using Stevia to kill the bacterium, Borrelia Burgdorferi, which causes the tick-borne disease.
July 17, 2017 - Record Journal
John DeCarlo, associate professor of criminal justice, comments on how the Petit home invasion tragedy has affected law enforcement agencies and how it forced them to step up their training
July 16, 2017 - Fox 61
Matthew Schmidt, assistant professor of national security and political science, comments on his conversations with Ukrainian military officials and on President Trump's relationship with Russia.
July 15, 2017 - WDAF-KC4 (Kansas City)
Eva Sapi, associate professor of biology, has found that the liquid form of Stevia is more effective than antibiotics given to patients to help cure Lyme disease.
July 13, 2017 - New York Post
Eva Sapi, associate professor of biology, has discovered that the liquid form of Stevia may be a cure for Lyme disease.
July 11, 2017 - Boston Business Journal
Abe Baggili, Elder Family Chair in engineering and assistant dean, and students in the Cyber Forensics Law, have developed a system where law enforcement can archive solutions to digital problems like looking into a phone or app to help fellow officers around the globe. The project is called the Artifact Genome Project and is like the Human Genome Project.
July 11, 2017 - Fox 61
Eva Sapi, associate professor of biology, has discovered that Stevia extract, works better to kill the bacteria that causes Lyme disease than antibiotics do. Her work in the laboratory is now being tested on humans in New York.
July 10, 2017 - Fox 61
Matt Schmidt, assistant professor of national security and political science, says the Putin-Trump meeting before the G-20 meeting was a win for Russia.
July 7, 2017 - Hartford Courant
Susan Campbell, distinguished lecturer in communications, comments on how the state's budget and the defunding of Community First Choice, a Medicaid program, can affect many adults with intellectual disabilities. 
July 6, 2017 - Draxe.com
This story reports on findings by Eva Sapi, professor of biology, who found Stevia kills the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease better than antibiotics.  Her work in a test tube is now being tested on humans.
July 6, 2017 - Newsweek
Howard Stoffer, associate professor of national security, comments on non-military actions the U.S. can take to stop North Korea from testing and deploying missiles.
July 6, 2017 - WFSB-TV3
UNH Professor Could Have Cure for Lyme Disease
This story reports on findings by Eva Sapi, professor of biology, who found Stevia kills the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease better than antibiotics.  Her work in a test tube is now being tested on humans.
July 5, 2017 - Daily Signal
4 Response Strategies for Trump After North Korea's New Missile Test
Howard Stoffer, associate professor of national security, proposes diplomatic solutions to North Korea’s test of an ICBM. 
July 5, 2017 - The Daily Item
O.J., JonBenet, Barbara Miller
Henry C. Lee, chaired professor of forensic science and the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, will help the Sunbury police department investigate the cold case of Barbara Miller. Police suspect the 30-year-old Sunbury, Penn. woman was murdered and her remains hidden inside a residence.
University of New Haven student, Asia Hutchins, discusses her mission to help agencies provide better support for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence within the Asian community. She was awarded a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship to work on this project.
July 1, 2017 - New Haven Register
University of New Haven Professor Studying Whether Stevia Can Kill Lyme Disease Bacteria
Eva Sapi, associate professor of biology, has found that the liquid form of Stevia has killed more bacteria than antibiotics that are typically given to patients to cure Lyme disease.