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Emmy-Award Winning TV Host and Producer Laurel Vlock’s Shows Now Archived at UNH’s Peterson Library

Release Date:
10/18/2011 12:00 AM
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Oct. 18, 2011

University of New Haven: Laurel Vlock Laurel Vlock

WEST HAVEN, CONN. -- An archive of the more than 230 programs recorded by Laurel Vlock, an Emmy-award winning television host and producer who worked in the New Haven area for more than 30 years, has been digitized and is now available on DVDs as part of the Laurel Vlock Video Archive at the Marvin K. Peterson Library at the University of New Haven.

Vlock, who grew up in New Haven and lived in Woodbridge, Conn., died in a car accident in 2000 at the age of 74.  She worked independently for WTNH in New Haven, PBS and for the National Jewish Television Network.

“Laurel’s television programs explored moral, ethical and philosophical topics.  She challenged our beliefs,” said UNH President Steven H. Kaplan.  “She taught us valuable societal lessons that are still relevant to students today.”

UNH is also home of the Laurel Vlock Center for Convergent Media in Maxcy Hall.  The center houses the latest in digital technology and features Apple computer workstations with 23-inch high definition cinema display screens, and five XSAN servers with 48 terabytes of memory.  The center is the only Apple-certified center at a Connecticut university that trains students and media pros on Final Cut Pro software. 

Vlock produced more than 70 of her “Dialogue with Laurel Vlock” programs at UNH, where she spent nearly every Friday morning for seven years working with Paul Falcone, director of institutional and instructional media. 

Falcone and his students digitized the work for the archives.  Vlock loved producing the work at UNH, Falcone recalled.

“Laurel would say ’I love the fit.’  What she loved was working with students and being a part of their learning experience,” Falcone said. “She would always make time for the student crew, getting to know what she could about each and every one of them. She fostered their interests in having productive and responsible careers in the media.”

The UNH archive is important as a teaching tool, according to Falcone.  “While we can no longer produce ‘Dialogue with Laurel Vlock’ we can do our best to teach students the quality standards she adhered to,” he said.

The archive also includes Vlock’s work for the Jewish Spectrum series done for the National Jewish Television Network as well as a number of other programs on a wide range of topics. Vlock, who learned about the Holocaust on a trip to Europe as a youth, also produced a number of programs for public broadcasting that recorded survivors’ memories.

In 1980, Vlock served as the executive producer and host of an Emmy award-winning documentary for New York's WNEW-TV entitled "Forever Yesterday" about Holocaust survivors.  In 1981, she co-anchored with CBS correspondent David Schoenbrum five PBS special broadcasts from Israel of the World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors in Jerusalem.

The Laurel Vlock Video Archive is open to the public on closed reserve. This means that the public can come to the UNH library and view any of the programs in the library during normal operating hours.

A leader in experiential education, the University of New Haven provides its students with a valuable combination of solid liberal arts and real-world, hands-on professional training. Founded in 1920, UNH is a private, top-tier comprehensive university with an 82-acre main campus. The university has an enrollment of more than 5,900: approximately 1,700 graduate students and more than 4,200 undergraduates, 70 percent of whom reside in university housing. The university offers 75 undergraduate and graduate degrees through the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences, the Tagliatela College of Engineering and University College. University of New Haven students study abroad through a variety of distinctive programs.