Homeland Security & Emergency Management Bachelor of Science

Our country faces ongoing threats, from terrorism and cyber attacks to wildfires and floods. By studying homeland security and emergency management, you’ll learn to protect the wellbeing of the nation and its citizens, and you’ll develop into the leader people turn to when disaster strikes.

Prepare to Protect, Serve, and Respond

Homeland security and emergency management focuses on protecting the homeland and responding to – and recovering from – man-made and natural disasters. Our program is extraordinarily unique because it combines two important areas of study into one. This model is what employers are looking for.

We are cross-training students to provide you with a well-rounded picture of what is going on in the world today. We’ll instill in you the skills to respond appropriately to these challenges and the ability to navigate complex issues. You can choose to focus your degree in either homeland security or emergency management, or complete both tracks.

In the homeland security track, you’ll prepare for careers in homeland security at the federal, state, or local level by:

  • Exploring complex issues of immigration and border security
  • Becoming knowledgeable about potential threats to the nation’s critical infrastructure
  • Studying transportation security and weapons of mass destruction
  • Learning to respond to threats of terrorism

In the emergency management track, you will learn to manage and coordinate the multi-agency response to and recovery from man-made and natural disasters by:

  • Mastering the tools and methods involved in emergency management
  • Learning the principles of fire science technology
  • Exploring concepts in hazard risk management, hazard mapping, and modeling

Create Your Own Path

Our program includes 17 free electives intentionally built into the program that enable you to further your specialization in either homeland security or emergency management. There are also several new courses being introduced, such as our maritime security course, allowing you to take courses that other colleges and universities simply aren’t offering.

You can add to your experience by minoring in disciplines such as criminal justice or fire science, or prepare to pursue master’s degree in national security or emergency management, including 4+1 options.

We also offer outstanding internship opportunities for our students. As just one example of many, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offers a six-week summer internship in which our students can earn $25 per hour as a disaster assistance employee. Some of the responsibilities of this position include follow-up and relief efforts and assisting with strategy in the aftermath of disasters such as fires, hurricanes, and tornadoes.

Nearly 80 percent of federal employees work for the Department of Homeland Security, and job opportunities are projected to increase each of the next ten years. Potential careers are available in the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Homeland Security Investigations, the Coast Guard, FEMA, local and state governments, and the private sector. In fact, almost every major corporation in the United States has an emergency management office. The possibilities are endless.

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Learn from professors who are dedicated to your success.

Our faculty are leaders and innovators in their fields, bringing both deep professional experience and academic rigor to the classroom.

Selected Courses and Programs
  • Emergency Scene Operations

    The responsibilities and operating modes of officers commanding fire department units, including engine, ladder, and rescue companies. A basic study of the Incident Command System and its application. Initial evaluation of the problems confronting first responding units. Outline of particular problems encountered in various types of occupancies, buildings, and situations. Stress on safety of the operating forces as well as of the public. Standpipe and sprinkler system utilization.

  • Scientific Methods in National Security

    Introduction to the use of scientific methods and logic in the field of national security. Topics will include science and the scientific approach to problem solving, the logic of causal inference, problem and hypothesis formulation, the use of experimental designs, laboratory methods, survey research methods, and measurement issues in national security.

  • Infrastructure Protection

    This course will examine the 16 critical infrastructures in the U.S. Those sectors involving networks are identified and network vulnerabilities are discussed. Bok’s sand pile and its application to critical infrastructure is explored. As most of the critical infrastructure is privately owned, the roles and responsibilities of federal, state, local, and tribal governments in identifying vulnerabilities to critical infrastructure and protecting these critical infrastructures against man-made actions and natural disasters is discussed. Federal policy on critical infrastructure (PPD-21) is reviewed.

  • Transportation Security

    This course examines U.S. transportation security in the aviation, maritime, rail, and trucking sectors, and vulnerabilities in each mode of transportation. International transportation security issues are also examined. Event such as the September 11, 2001, commercial aircraft hijackings, the 2004 Madrid train bombings, and the July 7, 2005, train and bus bombings in England are examined in depth. Tabletop exercises in each transportation field will give students an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of security and response in each sector.

  • Full List of Courses for Homeland Security & Emergency Management

    The University of New Haven offers a wide variety of in-depth courses that create a transformational educational experience for our students. To view the complete list of courses you'll take while pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Homeland Security & Emergency Management, check out the Academic Catalog:

    Homeland Security and Emergency Management, B.S.

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