Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science

“I knew I was going to get a hands-on internship, where I would be directly involved and learning,” said Mike Fallon ‘18, who interned with the Drug Enforcement Administration. “The faculty does a tremendous job helping students get internships and teaching us how to be professional.”

Investigate your crime-solving potential

As a criminal justice major at the University of New Haven, you’ll join one of the nation’s most established and diversified criminal justice programs. It’s a program that allows you to customize a major that fuses your interests with pragmatic, sought-after learning opportunities that will lead you to a successful and fulfilling career in this challenging and rewarding field.

You will gain an acute understanding of crime-solving and public safety issues as you learn to not only navigate the intricate fields of criminal justice but also shape the future of our justice system.

Concentrate on What Interests You

Supplement the knowledge you gain in your core criminal justice classes by specializing in an area you are most passionate about.

Correctional Rehabilitation and Supervision

Emphasizes law, social and behavioral sciences, and research methodology and prepares you for careers with federal, state, and local correctional agencies and institutions.

Crime Analysis

Focuses on the application of advanced computer and geographical information systems (GIS) in the collection and analysis of crime data.

Crime Victim Services

Prepares graduates for entry into a wide variety of positions in law enforcement, criminal justice, the courts, corrections, and victim services programs as well as professional settings involving work with victims of crime, their families, and the community at large.

Investigative Services

An interdisciplinary program geared toward enhancing the scientific knowledge of those students seeking investigative positions in various enforcement agencies, the curriculum emphasizes law enforcement, evidence, and forensic science.

Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Prepares service providers with knowledge of law and of social and behavioral sciences as well as communication skills with children, adolescents, and people of diverse cultural backgrounds.

Police Science

The curriculum focuses on the roles, activities, and behaviors of people with regard to maintaining law and order, providing needed services, protecting life and property, and planning and research.

In addition, you’ll:
  • Develop skills that will help you more quickly solve crimes and bring perpetrators to justice
  • Understand the psychology behind the criminal mindset
  • Study in up-to-the-minute facilities and labs housing technologies that are more advanced than the ones found in most police agencies across the country
  • Translate classroom theory into practice through unprecedented internships and co-op opportunities in law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and more
  • Be part of a prestigious alumni network known for its career support and student involvement
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Learn More In Person

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Saturday, December 23, 2017

Spotlights

Innovative Courses

  • Police and Crime Control

    This course explores the changing role, perspectives, and operational strategies of policing as they relate to the crime control function of the police. The focus will be on innovative, promising, emerging, or “futuristic” and often highly controversial police practices, programs, and approaches to law enforcement. In addition, the course will focus on selective community crime prevention efforts undertaken in conjunction with, under the auspices of, or independently of the police department. Special attention will be devoted to police brutality and the use of deadly force and its consequences, including high-speed police pursuits.

  • White-Collar Crime Investigation

    In this advanced course, students will focus on the history, philosophy, evolution, and types of white-collar crimes. This course will examine the various types of white-collar offenses and explore how and why such crimes are committed. The course will also explore the various laws used to combat such offenses and consider the investigative techniques used to identify those engaged in such activity. In addition, the course will explore the profile of the modern white-collar offender and the roles of the various federal law enforcement agencies responsible for investigating white-collar crime.

  • Homeland Security and Terrorism

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the concept of homeland security from administrative, organizational, historical, and critical perspectives. The course will be taught in a critical-thinking context rather than a training context. Specific emphasis will be placed on homeland security as a public safety paradigm and the implications of this paradigm on government agencies at the state and local level, overall national security, and public perception/opinion. A key component of this course is the presentation, analysis, and discussion of critical issues in homeland security. This is also an advanced course designed to familiarize students with the history and evolution of terrorism, the key concepts and theories of terrorism, the roles and responsibilities of counterterrorism agencies in the U.S., and the critical issues and controversies of the current “War on Terrorism.”

  • Death Investigation

    This course is an in-depth study of the principles and techniques associated with investigating homicides, suicides, and accidental, natural, or equivocal deaths. While considering the sociological, psychological, and legal aspects typically found in these cases, the process will take the student from the scene to the court – either criminal or civil.

  • Full List of Courses for Criminal Justice

Learn from professors who are dedicated to your success.

Our faculty are leaders and innovators in their fields, bringing both deep professional experience and academic rigor to the classroom.

Next Steps

  • Admission Requirements

    Whether you're still in high school or are transferring from another college, we offer full- and part-time opportunities for undergraduates from inside the U.S. and abroad. The admission process can begin as early as the end of your high school junior year.

    The Application Process

  • Financial Aid Opportunities

    We offer a comprehensive financial aid program, with students receiving assistance in the form of grants, scholarships, student loans, and part-time employment. Funds are available from federal and state governments, private sponsors, and from university resources. More than 85 percent of the University's full-time undergraduate students receive some form of financial assistance.

    Learn More